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Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
a key issue the presidential campaign as the economy continues to falter. >> this country doesn't succeed when only the rich get richer. we succeed when the middle class gets bigger. >> rose: joseph stiglitz is a nobel prize winning economist. in his new book the price of inequality, how today's divided society endangers our future. he argues that a wealthy minority in this country has fed a vicious circle of growing inequality. i'm pleased to have joe stiglitz back at this table. welcome. >> nice to be here. >> rose: where do you think the american economy is today? and is it trending upwards? >> it's not really trending upward. i guess i would describe it as part of-- i call it a long slump, long malaise unless we do something. >> rose: right. >> you know there are two big gaps in our economy, relative to say 2007 before the crisis. one is real estate. real estate was the big sector, the bubble broke and now real-estate investment is half of what it was. no way that that is going to recover soon. the only good news is the houses were shodly onstructed and it may be 5 or 10 yea
direction. look at where we are. the economy is barely limping along. it is growing at 1.3 percent. >> for a guy who says 47 percent of the american people are unwilling to take responsibility for their lives my friend recent y in a peach says 30 percent are takers, these people are my mom and dad, the people i grew up, and my neighbo, th pay more effective tax than governor romney pays in his federal income tax. >> their ideas are old and their ideas are bad and they eliminate the guarantee of medicare. >> that statistic was completely misleading but more importantly -- >> that's the facts. >> this is what politicians do when they don't have a record to run on. >> rose: joining me now in new york is rich lowry, editor of the "national review", from danville is mark halperin of time magazine, chuck todd of nbc news and from washington al hunt, executive editor of bloomberg news, joining us shortly from washington will be katty kay of the bbc world news america, gwen ifill of pbs and joining us in new york is john dickerson of nbc news and slate magazine, i am glad to have all of th
organized. >> rose: mexico's economy is doing how well now or how bad? >> well, doing well. i received today the report of july and again the economic growth was bigger than expected. 4.7 for july. >> rose: we'd take that here. >> that's good. let me tell you, we suffered a lot in the economic recession, 2009. >> rose: right. >> however, mexican economy expanded almost 16% since the second semester of 2009. so we had like 13 quarters in a row growing and generating like 700,000 new jobs in the formal sector which is very good for mexico. and i think that finally the economy is becoming very, very competitive. let me give you a couple of examples. when i took office six years ago mexico was the 9th largest exporter of vehicles in the world. and today we are the fourth largest exporter of vehicles in the world. so we are, for instance, the first exporter of flat screen and it's becoming a very, very good economy. and it's not only that we are very close to the united states which is clearly an advantage, but also we are investing a lot of infrastructure and in a very important thing, charlie,
in business and the economy and technology and i had a front row seat for 20 years watching this. >> rose: lessons of geography, a new movie and a life stephen shepard lived in journalism when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: robert kaplan is here, he is chief geopolitical analyst and has been writing about foreign affairs for 25 years. in his latest book he says to better understand global issues we must look to a map. he examines how geography has influenced the balance of world power and how it can inform foreign policy in the future. it is called "the revenge of geography." i'm pleased to have him back on this program. welcome. >> rose: >> a pleasure to be here, charlie. >> rose: henry kissinger said-- and you put this at the top-- that "robert kaplan's research shines light on an ancient truth. geography has been the predominant factor in determinesing the fate of nations, from fay roenic egypt to the arab spring." how long have you been thinking about tht? >> my whole career as a foreign corres
was similarly savvy. he believed that national security came from a good economy, that that was the most important thing you could do, other than having -- >> rose: exactly what barack obama said at west point? >> right. and was right. but eisenhower kept his eye on that ball, and he knew that the pentagon was going to exaggerate and hype the threat because he had been a genal andhe knew that is -- >> rose: but there were moments in which people thought he should have shown more courage. >> there were. on civil rights he did not use the bully pulpit as well as he should have. >> rose: richard nixon said he was devious. >> yes. you can have in great quote that eisnehower was a more devious man than people realized and i mean that in the best sense of the word. and he was being sincere and wasn't being funny it is true, eisenhower was deef you in the best sense of the word. >> rose: devious in what way? >> well, he wouldplay dumb is one thi i love about the guy guy talkable about his confidence, once before a conference his aides are coming and saying mr. president you have to be careful,
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)